Enriching Lives As We Age

Archive for the ‘Senior Housing’ Category

Peter Olson Appointed CEO for Peninsula Volunteers, Inc.

Friday, September 30th, 2016

Peninsula Volunteers Inc. (PVI), a non-profit organization serving older adults on the mid-Peninsula, is pleased to announce the appointment of Peter Olson as its new Chief Executive Officer.  Serving as PVI’s Director of Little House, The Roslyn G. Morris Activity Center, since 2010, Peter is ideally suited to provide leadership for PVI as it enters into its next chapter of expanding services and evolving to meet the needs of today’s seniors.

As CEO Peter will oversee Peninsula Volunteers‘ four major programs:
1) Meals on Wheels providing over 78,000 hot, nutritious meals yearly to home-bound older adults in San Mateo County;  2) Rosener House , Adult Day Services providing a therapeutic activity program for over 150 clients and respite care for 400+ family caregivers; 3) Little House, The Roslyn G. Morris Activity Center, providing an extensive array of services centered on health, wellness, and social interaction to over 3,500 community members annually; 4) Senior Housing in Menlo Park currently providing 82% of the affordable housing for community seniors;.

“I am excited to lead Peninsula Volunteers into its eighth decade,” said Peter Olson, CEO of PVI.  “Since opening its doors in 1947, PVI has been providing quality, innovative services and housing for the aging adults in Menlo Park and beyond, and it thrills me to carry this legacy forward.”

“We are delighted that Peter Olson has agreed to accept the role of CEO and lead Peninsula Volunteers in addressing the ever evolving needs of our growing senior population,” said Susan Sweeney, outgoing Board Chair of PVI.  “His excellent nonprofit leadership skills, his enthusiasm and ability to work effectively with a wide variety of individuals and organizations, and his vision and breadth of understanding of our senior community and the opportunities ahead for PVI make Peter the perfect leader in moving the organization forward in its expanding community role.”

In addition to his experiences at PVI, Peter has over 25 years of experience working in the not-for-profit sector, specifically older adults, individuals with special needs, and children. Peter’s professional experience includes the Director, Public Affairs and Communications for Easter Seals Bay Area and the Health and Wellness Director at the Easter Seals Timpany Center in San Jose. A graduate of San Jose State University, Peter enjoys the active outdoor lifestyle of the San Francisco Peninsula, spending time fishing, backpacking, cycling and is dedicated to spending time with his daughter.

Started by a group of forward thinking community leaders in 1947, PVI is a pioneer in providing high quality programs for Peninsula seniors, enabling them to maintain their dignity, independence, and sense of usefulness.  During the last year the PVI board and staff have been working with community leaders to align the services of Little House more closely to the needs of a changing senior population.

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About Peninsula Volunteers, Inc.
Peninsula Volunteers, Inc. is a pioneer serving older adults. Through its programs – Meals on Wheels, Rosener House Adult Day Services, and the Little House, Roslyn G. Morris Activity Center, – more than $5 million in services are delivered each year to 4,500 households, including 150,000 hot meals to seniors and the homebound.  Peninsula Volunteers Properties (PVP) provides 82% of the affordable senior housing in Menlo Park.

Aging in America, Through Immigrant Eyes

Monday, August 17th, 2015

by Chris Kenrick , Palo Alto Online
Monday, August 10, 2015.

In this book on aging, Stanford geriatrician, and his biologist wife, share observations that Americans can learn from more “traditional societies” around the world when it comes to the treatment of older people, says Mehrdad Ayati, a Stanford University geriatrician, who grew up in Iran.

Arriving in the United States with a newcomer’s eyes a decade ago, Ayati was struck by how, in contrast to his homeland, Americans appeared to view aging with fear and shame.

“This is a very youth-oriented, anti-aging society,” he said. “That’s why a lot of older people won’t ask for help, won’t walk with a walker or a cane or get a hearing aid.   “In traditional societies, this is not the case. Aging is always a sign of honor, and the oldest person in a family gets a lot of respect and is considered very sage their words carry a lot of substance. A young person would never get the message that ‘When I get older I’m going to be useless.’”

Negative cultural attitudes toward aging could even explain the loneliness and isolation leading to cognitive impairment that he observes in some of his geriatric patients, Ayati suggests.   “In traditional society, the oldest person is still at the center of the family and society,” he said. “The problem I see here is that when you retire in modern society, you retire to the solitude of your home and, if your partner passes away, you’re just by yourself. And loneliness is one of the major causes of cognitive impairment.”

The importance of social engagement for older people is a recurring theme in the book “Paths to Healthy Aging,” which Ayati recently co-authored with his wife, physiologist and molecular biologist Arezou (Hope) Azarani.   “When people ask me what’s the best climate for elderly people, I say, ‘The best climate is to be surrounded by people who love you and support you,’” he said.

Ayati and Azarani created “Paths to Healthy Aging” in the form of a workbook, each chapter beginning with a list of “questions to ask yourself” and ending with a “take-home message” and an “action plan.” Chapters cover nutrition, mental health, frailty and overmedication.

It’s not unusual for an older person to be taking as many as five to eight medications a day for conditions like high blood pressure and high cholesterol as well as diseases like diabetes, arthritis or congestive heart failure, Ayati said. Many also take over-the-counter supplements. At the same time, older people are more prone to the side effects of adverse drug interactions.

He cites the example of a patient who suffered a fatal brain hemorrhage following a fall Ayati believes was caused by overmedication a prescription for a cholinesterase inhibitor to treat mild short-term memory loss combined with strong sleeping pills that were added after the patient complained that the cholinesterase inhibitor was causing him to have vivid dreams. When stronger sleeping pills were added, the vivid dreams became delusional-like thoughts, nighttime anxiety and nightmares.

Ayati advises patients to keep an up-to-date list of all illnesses and medications, including dosages, and share them with all physicians and pharmacists; and also to question physicians about any newly prescribed medication and its possible interaction with other drugs.   “Take only what (medications) you truly need,” he said. “Any therapeutic benefit can be outweighed by the potential for drug cascade syndrome (when an undesirable side effect is misinterpreted as a medical condition and results in a new prescription) and other harmful interaction effects.”

Ayati is skeptical of over-the-counter medications, supplements and herbal remedies.   “Supplements can’t replace proper nutrition and should not be taken unless a blood test analysis ordered by your physician justifies prescribing them,” he said.   Most people should be able to get adequate vitamins, including vitamin D and calcium, from food rather than supplements, he said.

Geriatricians are trained to understand the physiology of aging and the medical complexity of the aging process, he said.   “We’re trained to be a good listener, and also to try to find the best way not to make a case more complicated,” Ayati said.

He embarked on the book when he realized the 20-minute office visit was too short to cover everything he wanted to communicate to patients. “They leave my office and they get bombarded by contradictory claims, marketing campaigns and misinformation” about nutrition, vitamins, supplements and brain games, he said. “The way we wrote the book is very simple; we tried not to put any complexity in it so that any person with any level of education can get the message.”

For exercise, he recommends “strenuous” strength training with weights and resistance bands, pushups, pullups and situps at least twice a week, as well as balance training, such a walking backward or sideways or Tai Chi at least three times a week. On diet, he advises people to eat “nutritious foods in small portions more frequently and in good company.”

But Ayati returns, repeatedly, to the value of social interaction for healthy aging.   “You can have the best cheese, the best wine, the best Mediterranean diet and the best olive oil, but if you’re in the solitude of your apartment looking at the window it’s not as beneficial as eating with others,” he said.

He said he frequently sees depression and memory loss among his immigrant patients who have been brought here by their children and spend their days caring for grandchildren.

“Their quality of life is actually worse here because they left behind the social network of their home country,” Ayati said. “You need to have interactions with people of your age and cultural background.”

But “aging can actually be a time of growth and development” for people who keep up friendships and have a positive attitude, he said.

“One of the book reviewers got back to me and said that after reading the book she called her husband because she wanted to ask him, ‘How many friends are we going to have when we retire?’”

Contributing writer Chris Kenrick | ckenrick@paweekly.com.

Rosener Open House

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

SAVE THE DATE!

Come experience our adult activity program in action!

There will be classes led by professional staff, informational sessions with our social work staff, and our Registered Nurse and therapists will be available.

Rosener House is celebrating 36 years of care for adults with challenges, including post-stroke, Parkinson’s, mild cognitive impairment or dementia.

500 Arbor Road, Menlo Park / 650-322-0126

Saturday, May 9th

10:00 am-1:00 pm

Baby Boomer Retirement Trends

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Planning ahead for your future? Check out some retirement trends reported by a new Census Bureau report:

  • “There are 11 states with more than a million people age 65 and older, led by California with some 4.3 million. The states with the highest percentages of people age 65 and older are Florida, West Virginia, Maine and Pennsylvania. The states with the lowest proportions of senior citizens are Alaska, Utah and Texas.

The average income for those between ages 65 and 69 is $37,200, but drops to a little less than $20,000 for those over age 80. The main sources of income for people over 65 are Social Security (37 percent), income from working (30 percent), pensions (19 percent) and savings and investments (11 percent). Younger retirees derive more income from working and investments, while older retirees rely more on Social Security.

The poverty rate for people age 65 and older is lower than any other age group. And the percentage of people 65 an older who own their own home has remained steady since before the great recession at 81 percent, while the percentage of people under 35 owning their own home has dropped from 43 percent in 2006 to about 37 percent today.”

Peninsula Volunteers is dedicated to helping you find a enjoyable lifestyle during your golden years. With affordable living and a family-like environment, we can assure you that we provide the best services in Menlo Park. To read more statistics like these, click 12 Baby Boomer Retirement Trends posted by U.S. News.

Find Affordable Living With Us

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

Seniors in California face different struggles everyday. Beyond the journey of aging, the challenge to live with self-sufficient independence hits a wall when cost of living exceeds our nation’s Social Security program. Henry Ramos of the Huffington Post recently wrote:

“During the recession, California legislators cut monthly payments, suspended and then eliminated cost-of-living adjustments. In doing so, they took $4.6 billion out of circulation in the localities where benefits recipients live (source). At its current level, SSI leaves 1.3 million other Californians not only below this important self-sufficiency standard but below the federal poverty level.”

The importance of reinvesting in our seniors is greater now than ever. Peninsula Volunteers works in conjunction with Crane Place & Partridge-Kennedy Apartments, to provide low-cost living for our local seniors of Menlo Park. As an organization we understand that the demands of living are high, which is why we’re committed to lend the helping hand you or a loved one may need.

To learn more about our senior housing visit http://www.penvol.org/seniorhousing. To read the entire article written by Ramos click here.

Aging Well Is Within Your Reach

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

We don't just sit around at Crane Place.

Read it, do it, and live well longer!

It’s nice to have the researchers confirm what we’ve been saying at Peninsula Volunteers for years: that living well longer requires fitness, intellectual stimulation, and socialization. We actually say that it requires SIX things: add to the above list good nutrition, safe housing and a reason for being.

Peninsula Volunteer programs (Meals on Wheels, Little House, Rosener House, Crane and Partridge-Kennedy Apartments) provide all six factors.

We see that every day. People participating in PV programs are living well and independently longer. Now you know why.

See what the experts say (from 2/19/14 SF Chronicle): http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Aging-well-exercise-mental-stimulation-social-5246368.php

Samuel Merritt Nurses at Crane Place

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Our Samuel Merritt nursing students have been doing an excellent job of health promotion at Little House, Rosener House and Meals on Wheels.

Come join them at Little House every Thursday morning until Thanksgiving week for: snacks, recipes, screenings, and yet another creative and fun activity to promote healthy living.

What they have also undertaken is to bring the  FUN to our Crane Place Apartments residents in Menlo Park. Click here to take a look.

Peninsula Volunteer Properties Breaks Ground

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Groundbreaking for the long anticipated Crane Place Landscaping Project was held November 19 at 9a.m. sharp!  Participating were representatives from Peninsula Volunteers; Barcelon Associates, who manage the complex; Crane staff and residents.

Upon completion, Crane Place, a 90 unit low-income housing project in Menlo Park, one of two owned by Peninsula Volunteers, will be a Class A project in every respect.The scope of the redesign of the landscaping ranges from the aesthetic to safety upgrades in paving, drainage, irrigation and lighting.

This project furthers our commitment to provide quality housing to Menlo Park low-income seniors. It will truly be the Peninsula Volunteer “crown jewel”.

Crane Place was a pioneering venture by Peninsula Volunteers, under our sister corporation, Peninsula Volunteer Properties Inc. It was the second such complex we built, the first being Partridge Kennedy Apartments, which itself was the very first HUD financed private senior low income housing project in the entire United States!

In fact, President John F. Kennedy, in a letter to PV in 1961, cited our efforts as an example for the nation:

“Your leadership in sponsoring retirement housing is an example for all the nation. The start you have made will soon be followed by similar projects like yours.”

To view the video, Crane Place Ground Breaking